Upcoming Events

January 29, 2018

“What Women Therapists Should Know About working with Difficult Male Clients” by Terry Real

Talk:

We’ve all met troubled men who are irresponsible, oppressive, or emotionally absent. Treating them requires a range of strategies. In this talk you’ll learn how to effectively work with issues of shame and grandiosity, as well as toxic engagement and disengagement. You’ll focus on how to identify and develop different approaches for working with men---ranging from mentoring to coaxing to using leverage

 

Bio:

Terry Real is a nationally recognized family therapist, author, and teacher. He is particularly known for his groundbreaking work on men and male psychology as well as his work on gender and couples; he has been in private practice for over twenty-five years. Terry has appeared often as the relationship expert for Good Morning America and ABC News. His work has been featured in numerous academic articles as well as media venues such as Oprah, 20/20, The Today Show, CNN, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Psychology Today and many others.

 In 1997 he published the national bestseller: I Don’t Want To Talk About It, the first book ever written on the topic of male depression. That was followed by How Can I Get Through To You? an exploration of the role of patriarchy in relationships and most recently, The New Rules of Marriage: What You Need to Know to Make Love Work, a practical guide for couples and couples therapists.

Terry founded The Relational Life Institute, in Arlington, Massachusetts, dedicated to working with the general population to help women reclaim their voices and men open their hearts. 

 

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October 21, 2017

Introduction to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) with Robyn Walser, Ph.D.

A workshop for WMHC Members Only

Saturday, October 21, 2017

8:30 AM - 4:30 PM

Vanderbilt Suites

ACT is an evidence-based psychotherapy that uses acceptance and mindfulness strategies mixed in different ways with commitment and behavior-change strategies to increase psychological flexibility. The objective of ACT is not the elimination of difficult feelings; rather, it is to be present with what life brings us and to “move toward valued behavior.” ACT invites people to open up to unpleasant feelings and learn not to overreact to them or to avoid situations where they are invoked. Its therapeutic effect is a positive spiral where feeling better leads to a better understanding of the truth. The principles of ACT can be applied to the treatment of many different presenting problems.

Robyn D. Walser, Ph.D., is the assistant director at the National Center for PTSD at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System. She received her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Nevada, Reno. During her graduate studies, she developed expertise in traumatic stress, substance abuse, and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). She has led ACT workshop trainings, both nationally and internationally, since 1998, training in multiple formats and for multiple client problems.

The workshop will include an overview of the principles of ACT and instruction in techniques as well as experiential and clinical practice. Participants will leave with concrete skills to use in his or her practice.Breakfast and lunch will be provided. We are looking into offering CE’s to psychologists, professional counselors, MFTs, substance abuse counselors, behavior analysts and social workers in New York and New Jersey.

Breakfast and lunch will be provided. We are looking into offering CE’s to psychologists, professional counselors, MFTs, substance abuse counselors, behavior analysts and social workers in New York and New Jersey.

RSVP Required - Space limited. 
To RSVP please find the button at the bottom of this page. 
You will need to be registered and logged into our website to RSVP. 

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October 4, 2017

Quartery Meeting: Rethinking Positive Thinking

TOPIC

“Think positive!” quotes are found everywhere, but contrary to popular belief merely thinking positively about the future hurts effort and success. Research conducted over more than 20 years finds that dreaming about a desired future leads to low effort and little success. So, how can we avoid the perils of positive thinking? By juxtaposing our dreams with personal obstacles, we pursue desired futures that can be realized and let go from those that cannot. I will talk about this self-regulation strategy, mental contrasting, its non-conscious mechanisms, and how people can use it autonomously as a cost- and time-effective tool to fulfil their wishes and solve their concerns. Combining mental contrasting with implementation intentions (MCII) has proven to be particularly effective in changing behavior. I will discuss various ways of how MCII or – Wish, Outcome, Obstacle, Plan (WOOP) – can be used as an effective self-regulatory tool to improve one’s everyday-life and long-term well-being.


BIO

Gabriele Oettingen is a Professor of Psychology at New York University. She is the author of more than a 150 articles and book chapters on thinking about the future and the control of cognition, emotion, and behavior. She received her Ph.D. from the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich and the Max Planck Institute for Behavioral Physiology in Seewiesen, Germany. Her major contribution to the field is research on the perils of positive thinking and on Mental Contrasting, a self-regulation technique that is effective for mastering one’s everyday life and long-term development. Gabriele Oettingen’s work is published in social and personality psychology, developmental and educational psychology, in health and clinical psychology, in organizational and consumer psychology, as well as in neuropsychological and medical journals. Her findings contribute to the burgeoning literature on behavior and life style change, and educational institutions have increasingly become interested in the application of her research.

Her first trade book, RETHINKING POSITIVE THINKING: Inside the New Science of Motivation has been published by Current, an imprint of Penguin Random House, in October 2014 (for more information, see www.woopmylife.org). Books will be available for purchase.

6:30-8:30 Buffet Dinner will be served

RSVP required

Directions to Vanderbilt Suite

From Outside

If you are walking outside, from East 44th Street and Vanderbilt Avenue (one block east of Madison Ave – you will see Grand Central Terminal). You will see La Fonda Del Sol on your right. Go in through the Met Life Building’s entrance that is located directly next to La Fonda and head up the escalators immediately in front of you. These will lead you directly to the Vanderbilt Suites.

From Grand Central Terminal

Lexington Avenue Line 4, 5, or 6 / Shuttle Train to 42nd Street/Grand Central

Exit subway – follow exit signs to Metro North or Grand Central Terminal. Once inside Grand Central Terminal, walk to the information booth in the center. Look - There are only one set of escalators. Take the escalators up one flight. Walk straight through the revolving doors, veering left and then go up the first escalator. Vanderbilt Suites will be on your left, directly in front of the elevators.

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July 11, 2017

More Simply Human?: Blackness as a Mode of Relating

Members Only, RSVP Required
Tuesday, July 11, 2017
6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
RSVP by July 7

Vanderbilt Suites
Met Life Building
200 Park Avenue
44th Street & Vanderbilt Avenue
(enter from Grand Central Terminal)
Buffet Dinner Will Be Served

Our Speakers

Michelle Stephens, PhD — Rutgers

Michelle Stephens is a Professor in the Departments of English and Latino and Caribbean Studies, and will begin her appointment as the Dean of the Humanities in July, at Rutgers University, New Brunswick.  Originally from Jamaica, West Indies, she graduated from Yale University with a Ph.D. in American Studies. She teaches undergraduate courses in African American, American, Caribbean and Black Diaspora Literature and Culture and graduate courses in Race and Psychoanalysis and Archipelagic American Studies. She is the author of Skin Acts: Race, Psychoanalysis and The Black Male Performer (Duke 2014) and Black Empire: The Masculine Global Imaginary of Caribbean Intellectuals in the United States, 1914 to 1962 (Duke University Press, 2005). Her essay collection, Archipelagic American Studies, co-edited with Brian Russell Roberts, and the exhibition catalog Relational Undercurrents: Contemporary Art of the Caribbean Archipelago, co-edited with Tatiana Flores, are both being released from Duke University Press this year. She is also a 2016 graduate of the Licensure Qualifying Program at The William Alanson White Institute of Psychiatry, Psychoanalysis and Psychology.

Directions to Vanderbilt Suites

From outside

If you are walking outside, arrive at East 44th Street and Vanderbilt Avenue (one block east of Madison Ave – you will see Grand Central Terminal). You will see La Fonda Del Sol on your right. Go in through the Met Life Building’s entrance that is located directly next to La Fonda and head up the escalators immediately in front of you. These will lead you directly to the Vanderbilt Suites.

From Grand Central Terminal

Lexington Avenue Line 4, 5, or 6 / Shuttle Train to 42nd Street/Grand Central. Exit subway – follow exit signs to Metro North or Grand Central Terminal. Once inside Grand Central Terminal, walk to the information booth in the center. Look - There are only one set of escalators. Take the escalators up one flight. Walk straight through the revolving doors, veering left and then go up the first escalator. Vanderbilt Suites will be on your left, directly in front of the elevators.

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April 27, 2017

The W Connection

Members Only, RSVP Required
Thursday, April 27, 2017
6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Vanderbilt Suites
Met Life Building
200 Park Avenue
44th Street & Vanderbilt Avenue
(enter from Grand Central Terminal)
Buffet Dinner Will Be Served

The W Connection was created on the Upper West Side on Manhattan by two friends who were suddenly widowed within the space of one year. While dealing with their own personal tragedies, they experienced first hand the difficulty widows face in finding support services. After talking with many other widows, they found that was little in the way of organized help, support and guidance to assist women going through one of the most traumatic episodes in their lives and their experience was not unique. This revelation provided the genesis for The W Connection. The organization was founded in 2009 with the simple yet challenging goal of helping women rebuild their life after the death of a spouse.

The W Connection was created out of necessity. In 2007, I gave birth to my first child. Shortly after, my husband was diagnosed with cancer and died 2 months later when my son, William was just 3 months old. In 2008, I became a new mom and a new widow. While there was many books and support on being a new mom, there was very little support a widow. There was no “What to expect when expecting/widowed”. I quickly realized that you lose more than a spouse; you lose the of the vision of the life you thought you were going to have.

The W Connection supports widows through peer support. We want to make the distinction that we are not a therapy group. All of our volunteers are widows. We found that the best support for another widow is someone who gets it, which is another widow.

Our Speakers

(as seen on ABC)

Dawn Nargi — Co-Founder of The W Connection \ Life Coach \ Mindfulness Teacher

Dawn was suddenly widowed in 2008, 3 months after the birth of her son thus becoming a new mom and a new widow in the same year. In 2009, she co-founded W Connection to help widows rebuild their life after the death of a spouse. In her professional life, Dawn is a certified professional life coach, mindfulness teacher and public speaker giving workshops in the New York City Area.

Barbara Rosecan M.A. — Chapter Coordinator The W Connection \ Counselor

Barbara lost her husband and father of their two young boys, 8 years ago after a short battle with Cancer. Barbara Rosecan joined The W Connection as a volunteer serving as a mentor and then moving on to co-lead our Upper West Side chapters. In her Professional life for the past 30 years, Barbara has been a Therapist and Counselor, at a College, working with students with academic and personal issues.

Valerie Vail — Member The W Connection UWS

Valerie joined The W Connection in 2010 when her husband, Lewis died after a long battle with ALS. Valerie has always been a strong supporter of The W Connection’s mission and vision by being committed to helping other women through their grief, speaking openly to other widows about widowhood and bringing new widows to our chapter meetings in an effort to support them and help them move forward with their lives. Valerie is a sales and marketing executive and a mom to her now 14 year old daughter, Layla.

RSVP by April 25

Directions to Vanderbilt Suites

From outside

If you are walking outside, arrive at East 44th Street and Vanderbilt Avenue (one block east of Madison Ave – you will see Grand Central Terminal). You will see La Fonda Del Sol on your right. Go in through the Met Life Building’s entrance that is located directly next to La Fonda and head up the escalators immediately in front of you. These will lead you directly to the Vanderbilt Suites.

From Grand Central Terminal

Lexington Avenue Line 4, 5, or 6 / Shuttle Train to 42nd Street/Grand Central. Exit subway – follow exit signs to Metro North or Grand Central Terminal. Once inside Grand Central Terminal, walk to the information booth in the center. Look - There are only one set of escalators. Take the escalators up one flight. Walk straight through the revolving doors, veering left and then go up the first escalator. Vanderbilt Suites will be on your left, directly in front of the elevators.

Read More